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MarkLogic Java Client API 4.0.1

See: Description

Packages
Package Description
com.marklogic.client
The package provides the core classes, interfaces and exceptions for working with the database.
com.marklogic.client.admin
The package provides the classes for configuration and initialization of the REST server.
com.marklogic.client.alerting
A REST interface to MarkLogic alerting capabilities.
com.marklogic.client.bitemporal  
com.marklogic.client.datamovement
The MarkLogic Data Movement SDK supports long-running write, read, delete, or transform jobs.
com.marklogic.client.document
The package provides classes for creating, retrieving, updating, and deleting documents in the database for the REST server.
com.marklogic.client.eval  
com.marklogic.client.example.cookbook
The package provides examples for common actions in working with the database.
com.marklogic.client.example.cookbook.datamovement  
com.marklogic.client.example.extension
The package provides examples of extensions that operate on a batch of database documents.
com.marklogic.client.example.handle
The package provides examples of extensions that read or write database documents in a new way or with a new representation.
com.marklogic.client.example.util
The package provides utilities for bootstrapping and tearing down a MarkLogic REST instance.
com.marklogic.client.expression
The package provides classes for building Optic plan pipelines and expressions for execution on the REST server.
com.marklogic.client.extensions
The package provides base and support classes so you can derive a new Resource Manager to provide a client interface for a Resource Services extension on the REST server.
com.marklogic.client.extra.dom4j
The package provides an adapter for using the dom4j Open Source library to read and write XML documents, XML structured search, and other XML data structures.
com.marklogic.client.extra.gson
The package provides an adapter for using the GSON Open Source library to read and write JSON documents, JSON structured search, and other JSON input and output.
com.marklogic.client.extra.httpclient
The package supports optional configuration of the Open Source HttpClient library.
com.marklogic.client.extra.jdom
The package provides an adapter for using the JDOM Open Source library to read and write XML documents, XML structured search, and other XML data structures.
com.marklogic.client.extra.xom
The package provides an adapter for using the XOM Open Source library to read and write XML documents, XML structured search, and other XML data structures.
com.marklogic.client.io
The package provides the handle classes with different representations for document content when you read documents from the database or write documents to the database.
com.marklogic.client.io.marker
The package provides marker interfaces for reading and writing each kind of document format.
com.marklogic.client.pojo
The goal of this package (sometimes referred to as “the pojo facade” is to simplify working with custom Plain Old Java Objects (pojos) without hassling with persistence details.
com.marklogic.client.pojo.annotation  
com.marklogic.client.pojo.util  
com.marklogic.client.query
The package provides classes for queries including searching documents and reading values directly from indexes in the database for the REST server.
com.marklogic.client.row
The package provides classes for sending plan requests to and processing row responses from the REST server.
com.marklogic.client.semantics  
com.marklogic.client.type
The package provides interfaces specifying the type of an expression or value as passed to a PlanBuilder method or returned from a RowRecord method.
com.marklogic.client.util
The package provides loggers, specialized maps, and other utilities shared across other packages.

MarkLogic Java API

The MarkLogic Java API support reading, writing, and deleting document content and metadata as well as querying documents.

Before Starting

Before using the API, create a REST server for your database. If the database has existing documents, modify the roles with privileges to read and write those documents to inherit from rest-reader and rest-writer.

Creating a Database Client

Use DatabaseClientFactory.newClient() to create a client for a database. You can then use the DatabaseClient factory methods (which begin with "new") to create document, configuration, and query managers.

Working with Document Managers

Use the DatabaseClient to create the appropriate document manager for the format of the content -- a BinaryDocumentManager for a binary document or an XMLDocumentManager for an XML document. The client also provides JSONDocumentManager and TextDocumentManager document manager for those formats. Use GenericDocumentManager if you don't know the format or need to process multiple documents with different formats.

To identify a document in the database, you use a String with the document URI.

To access document content, you can create a handle object that provides strongly-typed support for an IO representation. This concept of content handles is core to the Java API (making use of the Adapter design pattern so the API can read or write content with a diverse and extensible set of representations). You can define new handle classes to integrate new IO representations into the API.

For frequently-used requests, you can also write an IO object or specify an IO class to read an object directly. Internally, these shortcut methods create the handle for you. By default, the IO representations supported in shortcut methods include byte[], DOM Document, File, InputStream, SAX InputSource, Reader, Transformer Source, String, StAX XMLEventReader, and StAX XMLEventWriter. You can enable shortcut support for dom4j Document, JDOM Document, GSON JsonElement, Jackson JsonNode, JAXB POJOs, or XOM Document.

For instance, consider a binary JPEG file. To write this file to the database using a strongly typed handle, you create a FileHandle and call the handle's set() method with the File object. You then pass the handle to the operation that writes the binary content to the database.

Similarly, let's say you want to read the content of an XML document from the database into a DOM document. You pass a DOMHandle to the operation that reads the XML content. The read operation populates the DOMHandle with the content. You can then call the handle's get() method to get the org.w3c.dom.Document object. In short, a handle acts as a container for content in a representation.

To read document content from the database, pass the document URI string and a handle to the read() method of the document manager. Then use the methods of the handle to get the content. The following example reads the content of the /db/path/to/myDoc.xml database document into a DOM document:

XMLDocumentManager docMgr = client.newXMLDocumentManager();
String docId = "/db/path/to/myDoc.xml";
DOMHandle handle = new DOMHandle();

docMgr.read(docId, handle);

Document document = handle.get();

The following example reads the document with the equivalent shortcut method:

XMLDocumentManager docMgr = client.newXMLDocumentManager();
String docId = "/db/path/to/myDoc.xml";

Document document = docMgr.readAs(docId, Document.class);

To write content to a document in the database, set the content in a handle and then pass the document URI string and the content handle to the write() method of the document manager. The following example write the content of the /db/path/to/myDoc.xml database document from a DOM document:

Document document = ... create or modify the document ...;

XMLDocumentManager docMgr = client.newXMLDocumentManager();
String docId = "/db/path/to/myDoc.xml";
DOMHandle handle = new DOMHandle();
handle.set(document);

docMgr.write(docId, handle);

The following example writes the document with the equivalent shortcut method:

Document document = ... create or modify the document ...;

XMLDocumentManager docMgr = client.newXMLDocumentManager();
String docId = "/db/path/to/myDoc.xml";

docMgr.writeAs(docId, document);

To learn which handles you can use to read the content of an XML document, look at the classes that implement XMLReadHandle. To learn which handles you can use to write the content of an XML document, look at the classes that implement XMLWriteHandle. BinaryDocumentManager, JSONDocumentManager, TextDocumentManager, and GenericDocumentManager each have corresponding read and write handles that identify the handle classes that can be used when reading and writing documents of that format. The shortcut methods of each document manager work with the same IO objects supported by the handles that are accepted by the document manager and that implement ContentHandle.

You can read or write document metadata in the same request as document content or separately.

Working with Query Options

To prepare a database for search applications, you will have created indexes on the fields and elements of documents. Query options declare and configure the use of indexes for search and query applications. You specify query options as a JSON or XML structure. You use QueryOptionsManager to write query options in JSON or XML to the server or to read query options back into the application.

The following example writes new query options named "shipments" with a single constraint. The constraint, of type "value" names the "port" location within documents for queries that use the "shipments" query options.

QueryOptionsManager optionsMgr = client.newQueryOptionsManager();

String options = new StringBuilder()
            .append("<search:options>")
            .append(    "<search:constraint name=\"port\">")
            .append(        "<search:value>")
            .append(            "<search:element name=\"port\" ns=\"\"/>")
            .append(        "</search:value>")
            .append(    "</search:constraint>")
            .append("</search:options>")
            .toString();

StringHandle handle = new StringHandle(options);

optionsMgr.writeOptions("shipments", handle);

The following example writes the query options with the equivalent shortcut method:

QueryOptionsManager optionsMgr = client.newQueryOptionsManager();

String options = new StringBuilder()
            .append("<search:options>")
            .append(    "<search:constraint name=\"port\">")
            .append(        "<search:value>")
            .append(            "<search:element name=\"port\" ns=\"\"/>")
            .append(        "</search:value>")
            .append(    "</search:constraint>")
            .append("</search:options>")
            .toString();

optionsMgr.writeOptionsAs("shipments", Format.XML, options);

Working with the Query Manager

Use QueryManager to search documents or extract values, co-occurrences of values, or full tuple records from document indexes. The search() method takes the name for search options that you wrote to the database previously, a query definition including the search criteria, and a handle for representing the results. You can supply search criteria as a string, keys-value pairs, or a structure. You can represent results as JSON, XML, or a Java data structure.

The following example uses the "shipments" query options written to database previously. The search criteria matches documents that contain the term "electronics" as well as a <port> element with a value of "Lisbon". The example reads the search results into a DOM document.

QueryManager queryMgr = client.newQueryManager();

StringQueryDefinition querydef = queryMgr.newStringDefinition("shipments");
querydef.setCriteria("electronics port:Lisbon");

DOMHandle handle = new DOMHandle();

queryMgr.search(querydef, handle);

Document results = handle.get();

Besides XML or JSON, you can also get search results as a Java data structure by using SearchHandle. This approach is often the most convenient way to manipulate search results as demonstrated in the following example:

QueryManager queryMgr = client.newQueryManager();

StringQueryDefinition querydef = queryMgr.newStringDefinition("shipments");
querydef.setCriteria("electronics port:Lisbon");

SearchHandle results = new SearchHandle();

queryMgr.search(querydef, results);

... do something at the response level (total response, metrics, and so on) ...
for (MatchDocumentSummary docSummary: results.getMatchResults()) {
    ... do something for a matching document ...
    for (MatchLocation location : docSummary.getMatchLocations()) {
        ... do something at the match location level ...
        for (MatchSnippet snippet : location.getSnippets()) {
            if (snippet.isHighlighted()) {
                ... do something with highlighted text ...
            } else {
                ... do something with unhighlighted text ...
            }
        }
    }
}

Concise Code with Fluent Interfaces

The API makes use of the Fluent Interface design pattern so that, when you become familiar with the API, you can execute operations concisely.

For instance, because the read() method returns the content handle, the earlier read operation can be expressed in a single line:

org.w3c.dom.Document document =
    client.newXMLDocumentManager().read(
        client.newDocId("/db/path/to/myDoc.xml"),
        new DOMHandle()
        ).get();

Because most handles provide a with() method that sets the content and returns the handle, you can a write operation in a single line:

Document document = ... create or modify the document ...;

client.newXMLDocumentManager().write(
    client.newDocId("/db/path/to/myDoc.xml"),
    new DOMHandle().with(document)
    );

When convenient, you can write a search operation in a single line:

Document results = client.newQueryManager().search(
    queryMgr.newStringDefinition("shipments").withCriteria("electronics port:Lisbon"),
    new DOMHandle()
    ).get();

Registering New IO Representations for Shortcut Methods

To use extra IO handles like DOM4JHandle, GSONHandle, JDOMHandle, or XOMHandle, you download the library integrated by the handle and add the library to the classpath. You can enable support in shortcut methods for the IO representation provided by an extra library by registering a factory for the handle using DatabaseClientFactory.getHandleRegistry().

You can also register a factory for the built-in JAXB and JacksonDatabind handles to support IO on your POJO classes in shortcut methods. The following example registers the JAXB handle for one or more POJO classes and writes and reads the POJOs as database documents. The same pattern works with JacksonDatabindHandle.

// configure once before creating a client
DatabaseClientFactory.getHandleRegistry().register(
        JAXBHandle.newFactory(Product.class, ... other POJO classes ...)
        );

// ... create a database client ...

XMLDocumentManager docMgr = client.newXMLDocumentManager();
String docId = "/db/path/to/myPOJO.xml";

Product product = ... create or modify the POJO ...;

docMgr.writeAs(docId, product);

// ... at some other time ...

Product product = docMgr.readAs(docId, Product.class);

Enabling Logging

We use slf4j for logging. This means you can choose any slf4j-compliant logging framework such as Logback, AVSL, JDK logging, Log4j, or Simple. If you don't know which to choose, we recommend Logback since it is a native implementation and the easiest to configure. Please follow the instructions on the slf4j website to configure your logging framework. It should take no more than 15 minutes. Once your logging framework is configured with slf4j, you should be able to see and manage logging from the Java-client API. This is especially important for long-running QueryBatcher and WriteBatcher jobs.




















































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